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Consistency the Key for Browne

Jack Novak

Unsung hero Tim Browne faces his old club this Friday when Canterbury takes on Manly at Brookvale Oval.

Browne has played all 11 matches for the Bulldogs this year, winning 8 and losing 3 at a winning percentage of 73%.

His statistics for season 2014 have been phenomenal for an interchange player, making 171 tackles, and running for 730m from his 73 hit-ups.

Averaging 16 tackles, 66m and 7 hit-ups per game, Browne is one of the most damaging forwards off the interchange bench in the competition.

In such a strong squad of forwards, the 193cm/113kg prop is aware that no one has a guaranteed spot in the 17, and he must be consistent every week in order to hold his place in the side.

“I’ve really tried to work hard on the little things in my game, I think I spoke about it at the start of the year, my catch pass and my consistency was the two biggest things I wanted to get right.

“I’m consistent in what I’ve been doing and I’ve forced my way in there and I’ve got to keep doing it to stay there because we’ve got such a ‘depthy’ squad and a lot of guys here that can take any position and any role so I’ve got to keep doing the things I’m doing to remain there,” said Browne.

After signing with the Bulldogs from Manly in 2009, ‘Browney’ made his debut in Round 10, 2010 against the Warriors. In similar circumstances to Trent Hodkinson, Browne spent a number of years in the rehabilitation room alongside his teammate and was open when giving some insights into his life during those darker days.

“I think for Trent as well, your family plays a massive role. My wife Ellie, I could never have done the things I’ve accomplished without her, at times you can’t even sort of wash yourself you need someone to help you in and out of the bath.”

Tim Browne’s story is that of courage, hard work and persistence. For someone who at times thought there would be no happy ending, his determination has led him to achieving 29 first grade games.

“At times you think you’re not going to get through; you can’t sort of see the light, but it swings slowly. I really knuckled down on the little things I was doing in my rehab and week by week got some confidence, a bit stronger in my knee and now I’m back to where I always wanted to be,” added Browne.