The annual event, which last year saw NRL players and Ambassadors visit 203,400 children at 840 schools across 358 towns, is part of Rugby League’s commitment to making a positive difference in the community and speaking out on issues of social significance. “The NRL is in a unique position to make a positive social difference,” said NRL Community, Culture and Diversity Interim General Manager, Mr Mark Deweerd. “We hope to give children the confidence and knowledge to cope with bullying and its effects through the powerful vehicle of Rugby League.” A key resource of the anti-bullying program is the NRL's “Tackle Bullying Green Hand”, a five-fingered action plan aimed at helping victims to cope and stand up to bullying. The certified action plan involves the following proactive strategies: 1. Stand Strong 2. Stay Calm 3. Respond Confidently 4. Walk Away 5. Report The resource will be distributed throughout the Community Carnival and children are encouraged to contact the Kids Helpline 1800 551 800 if they are finding it difficult to cope and need further support. Today’s rivals will tomorrow be united in their aim to empower students to cope with difficult social situations using the new “Tackle Bullying” educational resources developed by the NRL in conjunction with the Australian Catholic University (ACU) and leading psychologist, Dr Elizabeth Seeley-Wait. The Community Carnival is widely recognised as the largest community program in Australian sport, and is expected to deliver the “Tackle Bullying” program to almost 300,000 children this month. This program is about making a difference and it's exactly what Winger Sam Perrett hopes not only the Bulldogs can do, but the game as well. "I'm grateful to have that influence and share my experiences with the kids and to see the Bulldogs support such an important issue is great," said Perrett."> Bulldogs Deliver Tackle Bullying - Bulldogs
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Bulldogs Deliver Tackle Bullying

Steve Turner